Faculty/staff achievements

David Morgan

David Morgan

David Morgan, professor, Jazz Studies and String Bass, co-produced and arranged the music and played bass on a new album by vocalist Amanda Powell titled Beyond Boundaries. Other Dana School of Music faculty that contributed to the album include clarinetist Alice Wang, associate professor and acting director; percussionist Glenn Schaft, professor; pianist Cicilia Yudha, assistant professor; and pianist Alton Merrell, assistant professor. The album is a collection of songs from around the world, including Venezuela, Bulgaria, Mongolia, Ireland and the Middle East.

Bradley A. Shellito, associate professor, Geography, has authored a book, titled Discovering GIS and ArcGIS, published by Macmillan. This is the first edition of the new book, which is intended for use in upper-division courses. The text provides an in-depth look at the theory and methods of Geographic Information Science, a fast-growing job field for multiple industries.

Gary Walker

Gary Walker

Gary Walker, professor and chair, Biological Sciences, worked with graduate students Susan Rashid, YSU alumnus Robert Giles and Lorna Gallagher, who did post-doctoral research at YSU, to present results of a muscle stem cell study at the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology/International Federation for Cell Biology in Philadelphia. The study was titled “Analysis of gene expression in developing C2C12: changes in the proteome, titin and galectin-1.” The meeting was attended by about 10,000 conferees.

Rebecca Badawy

Rebecca Badawy

Rebecca Badawy, assistant professor, Management, presented three papers at the Southern Academy of Management conference in Savannah, Ga. on her research exploring employee identities at work. Two papers, entitled “Identity and Person-Job Fit: Do You See Me like I See Me?” and “Oh No, People Might See My Performance! The Impact of Felt Accountability, Competency Norms, and Tension on the Relationship between the Impostor Phenomenon and Performance,” identified how employee self-concepts impact expressed behaviors and task performance. The third paper, titled “How Do I Know I Fit? A Relational Identity Explanation,” found leaders to be a crucial factor in how employees develop their self-concepts at work. Badawy also presented a paper at the Hawaii International Conference of Systems Sciences in Kauai. Titled “Losing Control of Company Information in the Recruitment Process: The Impact of LinkedIn on Organizational Attractiveness,” the paper focused on the effect of social media sites on perceptions of corporate character.

Michael Crescimanno, professor, Jim Andrews, acting chair and professor, and Chuanhong Zhou, research associate, all of Physics and Astronomy, worked with senior physics major Michael Baker to co-author a paper, titled “Structure and Symmetry in Coherent Perfect Polarization Rotation,” published in Physical Review A. The paper explores new phenomena in coherent magneto-optics, with applications to optical switching and sensors. The work was funded through a grant from the National Science Foundation for which Crescimanno and Andrews are lead and co-principal investigators, respectively.

Gang Peng

Gang Peng

Gang Peng, associate professor, Management, was lead author of a research article, titled “Healthcare IT Adoption: An Analysis of Knowledge Transfer in Socioeconomic Networks,” published in the spring issue of Journal of Management Information Systems, considered a leading journal in its field. Co-authors were professor Debabrata Dey of the University of Washington in Seattle, and professor Atanu Lahiri of the University of Texas, Dallas. The researchers analyzed a longitudinal data set covering adoption of healthcare information technology by more than 5,000 hospitals across a 13-year time span. They proposed a research frame for leveraging knowledge transfer and socioeconomic networks to facilitate adoption of the technology by hospitals nationwide as a way to reduce medical errors, streamline clinical processes, contain healthcare costs and ultimately improve the quality of healthcare.